A Level Maths

The most popular A Level taken, but not exactly the easiest!

Maths is renowned as one of the toughest A-Level subjects. If you love maths, you will love it, but if it isn't really your favourite it isn't an easy subject. And you can't "just learn it". There is just so much of it and, to get a half way decent grade, you need to be able to apply your knowledge, so you do have to understand it.

So many students need that extra helping hand when it comes to A Level maths. Whether it is to ensure that top grade or just to get to grips with some of the basics. 

I am an experienced A Level maths teacher and examiner. So I know just what you need to do to get through the exams.

 

Often the pupils that struggle a bit just need some extra support, maybe something described in a different way, or a different method shown. Some of those that struggle are actually those that really want to understand it all, so just need a bit more time and support, but when they get there, they are often excellent, as they really do understand it.

 

Often confidence is a difficulty and they "freeze" when faced with a problem they haven't encountered before. This seems unsurmountable, but problem solving is a skill like any other and one that can be both taught and practiced.

Or may be they in a class of physicists but not doing physics themselves. Students who are not doing physics often struggle with some of the applied topics, particularly if everyone else in the class is doing physics. Again a bit of extra support and explanation can make a world of difference.

I have been teaching A Level maths for over 10 years, including many pupils who have found it hard but, with a little help, have moved forward. Recent past pupils have gone on to Oxford, Cambridge, Warwick, Leeds and Yale universities studying a range of subjects from maths and engineering to economics, history, PPE and architecture. This years pupils are currently holding offers from Cambridge, Durham, Imperial, Warwick, Liverpool, Heriot Watt, Leeds, Manchester, Nottingham and the Royal Veterinary College.

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